treatment resistant depression

Should I Get One or Multiple Ketamine Infusions?

Should I Get One or Multiple Ketamine Infusions?

Research supports multiple ketamine infusions are needed to minimize depression symptoms and maintain antidepressant effects. We recommend pursuing the 6 series infusion to start, followed by boosters as needed.

A single ketamine infusion can be effective within hours of the infusion to reduce depression symptoms for up to 80% of patients. However, these effects can last only up to a few days to a week. Multiple infusions in the form of a series of six infusions can prolong the antidepressant effects for up to several weeks (and for some people months).

In the setting of chronic, high-dose ketamine use in abusers, studies demonstrate unfavorable changes in the brain, and neurotoxicity in the rodent model.  Fortunately, one study of clinical ketamine use at Yale Psychiatric Hospital looking at patients who received ketamine infusions on a long-term basis showed no evidence of cognitive decline, delusions, or cystitis in their sample of patients.  

To understand what could be best for you, you’ll need to explore where the recommended protocol comes from and what can happen with too much for too long, and more. It’s a lot but no worries we’re here to walk you through it!

Maintenance Ketamine Infusions for Treatment-Resistant Depression

Maintenance Ketamine Infusions for Treatment-Resistant Depression

Multiple studies have shown the benefits of using ketamine for treatment-resistant depression. Typically, the spacing of the ketamine infusions have been either two or three times per week. However, one recent study published in 2019 in the American Journal of Psychiatry showed that the reduction in depression symptoms were maintained with once-weekly infusions.

Ketamine and Postpartum Depression

Ketamine and Postpartum Depression

She doesn’t want to get out of bed, she’s not the woman you knew, worse off she doesn’t want to hold her new baby. She is your wife, girlfriend, sister, or daughter. She is a new mother, and she has postpartum depression (PPD).  She knows something is off, but she is so deep in the weeds she doesn’t know where to begin.