ketamine infusions

Show notes from Dr. Ko's Podcast Interview on Ketamine

Show notes from Dr. Ko's Podcast Interview on Ketamine

Dr. Ko was recently interviewed by Dr. Jason Lahood and Kendall Alaimo at The Sentenced To Life Podcast. They discussed ketamine healing, near-death experiences, aromatherapy, set & setting, integration and a lot more in this conversation. Please check out the podcast episode (show some love and please subscribe to their podcast) where they, “smack down some real talk about mental health.”

You can listen to it on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

Should I Get One or Multiple Ketamine Infusions?

Should I Get One or Multiple Ketamine Infusions?

Research supports multiple ketamine infusions are needed to minimize depression symptoms and maintain antidepressant effects. We recommend pursuing the 6 series infusion to start, followed by boosters as needed.

A single ketamine infusion can be effective within hours of the infusion to reduce depression symptoms for up to 80% of patients. However, these effects can last only up to a few days to a week. Multiple infusions in the form of a series of six infusions can prolong the antidepressant effects for up to several weeks (and for some people months).

In the setting of chronic, high-dose ketamine use in abusers, studies demonstrate unfavorable changes in the brain, and neurotoxicity in the rodent model.  Fortunately, one study of clinical ketamine use at Yale Psychiatric Hospital looking at patients who received ketamine infusions on a long-term basis showed no evidence of cognitive decline, delusions, or cystitis in their sample of patients.  

To understand what could be best for you, you’ll need to explore where the recommended protocol comes from and what can happen with too much for too long, and more. It’s a lot but no worries we’re here to walk you through it!

Ketamine for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

Ketamine for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, disabling neurological condition. Previously known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), it affects 1.2% of the adult chronic pain population.  Women are affected more than men, with a 3:1 ratio. CRPS can develop after trauma, minor injuries, or surgery. The signs and symptoms are classically clustered into four groups: